Presentation About John Chapman IELTS Listening Answers With Audio, Transcript, And Explanation

Luyện tập đề IELTS Listening Practice với Presentation About John Chapman được lấy từ cuốn sách IELTS IELTS Trainer - Test 6 - Section 3 kèm Answer key, list từ vựng IELTS cần học trong bài đọc và Free PDF & Audio Transcript Download với trải nghiệm thi IELTS trên máy và giải thích đáp án chi tiết bằng Linearthinking
Presentation About John Chapman IELTS Listening Answers With Audio, Transcript, And Explanation

👂️ Audio and questions

Question 1 - 5
Choose the correct letter, A, B or C.
1
Why did Anita and Lee choose to talk about John Chapman?
A
He was Lee’s childhood hero.
B
They wanted to talk about the USA.
C
He was relevant to the topic of their studies.
2
Where did the students record their sources of information?
A
on their laptops
B
on a handout
C
on a database
3
The tutor claims she does not understand whether
A
apples grew in America before Europeans arrived.
B
the Native Americans had always eaten apples.
C
American apples were first bred in Europe.
4
The tutor says the audience was particularly interested to hear about
A
grafting techniques in ancient China.
B
the cultivation of apples in Kazakhstan.
C
the spread of apples along the Silk Route.
5
How will Anita and Lee present their follow-up work?
A
on the department website
B
as a paper
C
as a poster
Question 6 - 10
What do Lee and Anita agree about their presentation skills with their tutor?
 Write the correct letter A, B or C
List of Findings
A
excellent
B
acceptable
C
poor
6
use of equipment
7
handling software
8
timing of sections
9
design of handout
10
clarity of speech

❓ Transcript

Presentation About John Chapman
Tutor:
Well, Anita and Lee. That was an interesting presentation you made about John Chapman. There are a few points I'd like to run through before you write it up.
Tutor:
One thing which you didn't explain was why you decided to do a presentation on this man who spread apple varieties across the US?
Anita:
Well, ages ago, we were chatting about stuff we'd read as children, and I told Lee the Johnny Appleseed story – I had these American story books when I was small.
Anita:
Then when we were looking into the area of domesticated species of plants for our presentation, we realised that the introduction of the apple with the settlers in the US would be a good case study …
Lee:
And I remembered Chapman, so we looked up the real guy behind the legend.
Tutor:
Right. I think that would have made a good Intro.
Anita:
I thought it was too personal.
Tutor:
Just a couple of minutes would have drawn your listeners in. Anyway. Now a more serious point. You didn’t mention the sources of some of your information.
Lee:
We used some books and journal articles and did an internet search and found some good sites.
Anita:
We’ve put them on the back of the handout we gave everyone at the end.
Tutor:
Ah, let me see. Oh. here it is. Johnny Appleseed: Man and Myth, 1967. Well, the thing is. you really have to make this explicit when you talk. And anything you show, data you project from your laptop, etc., you must have the source on it.
Anita:
Right, OK.
Tutor:
At least you have got it all documented. I was a bit concerned about that.
Anita:
Sorry.
Tutor:
Anyway. Now, the content of your talk. What your listeners wanted to understand was whether there were apples in the US before the Europeans started to live there.
Tutor:
You told us the early settlers had brought young apple trees but that few of them had thrived because the climate was harsh, but what about native species? I don’t think you were very clear about species already there.
Lee:
Um, according to what I’ve read, there were some crab apples, but that was all. Everything that people now think of as traditional American apples, were species that the Europeans either introduced or bred by chance.
Anita:
Because they tended to sow seeds rather than use grafting.
Tutor:
Yes, quite. But what to me was fascinating – and I saw most members of your audience start to take notes – was when you discussed how the apple genes spread via the Silk Route into Europe from the wild apple woods of Kazakhstan.
Lee:
Yes, well. I'd like to have said more about the development of grafting in ancient China, as a way of producing predictable varieties. It was so early in history!
Tutor:
But it's the natural development of the original wild apple into new species that people wanted more about. Which says a lot for your presentation. You enthused your audience!
Tutor:
So, now we need to discuss the form your follow–up work will take. Are you going to produce a paper? Or are you thinking of putting it all up on the department website?
Anita:
Um, I felt we could do both. And we could do a poster of some of the data. But Lee wasn’t sure.
Lee:
No. I think it would be enough to use the website.We can offer a link to our email for queries. That would save time and trees!
Tutor:
I think Lee's right. A poster would be nice, but it'd take too much time.
Anita:
OK.
Tutor:
Now I just want to give you a few pointers about the techniques of your presentation. Mostly it was good, but there are a few things you need to bear in mind next time you do one. You both managed the hardware. I mean the projector and things, very well indeed, which is always a great help.
Anita:
Good.
Lee:
Thanks.
Tutor:
You'd obviously checked it out carefully.
Lee:
Yes. But unfortunately we hadn't finished our maps when we did the practice on my computer at home, that's why there were some the wrong way up.
Anita:
We didn’t realise the software on the laptop was a bit different from the one I have.
Tutor:
But you sorted out the problem very quickly and didn’t let it fluster you, so it wasn't a big problem. We could all read the map when we needed to.
Anita:
So it was OK. but we could have done better, we realise.
Tutor:
Mm. There was a bit at the end where I felt something didn't go as you’d planned – am I right?
Lee:
We had a few maps which we ended up leaving out, because we needed to get on to our conclusions.
Anita:
Yes, it took longer to explain the technical aspects of grafting than we'd expected.
Lee:
So sticking to the time limit for each part of our presentation is something we didn't manage at all. Which means we’ve definitely got to improve before we do another one.
Anita:
Yes.
Tutor:
Apart from that, well, the handout was perfectly, adequate for a seminar like this, it gave all the kev information, and, of course, now I realise the sources are listed at the back. But you need to do those references in the correct format, as footnotes, in. future.
Anita:
OK.
Lee:
Yes, sorry, we will.
Tutor:
And finally, other students will be presenting projects later in the course. I shall be reminding them how well you both spoke and that no one had any problem hearing or understanding either of you. In that respect your talk was a model that the others can follow.
Lee:
Oh. thank you.
Anita:
Yes, thanks very much. This feedback has been very helpful. Tutor Well done, both of you. See you in a fortnight.
Anita:
Bye. Thanks.

🔥 Answer key (đáp án và giải thích)

1
C

Giải thích chi tiết

Mình cần biết lý do họ chọn John Chapman

=> Đáp án sẽ có sau '' ... why you decided to do a presentation on this man who spread apple varieties across the US?'' smiley25 Đầu tiên, '' ... and I told Lee the Johnny Appleseed story – I had these American story books when I was small.''

=> Đây là chuyện Anita nghe từ nhỏ, không phải Lee (Jonny Appleseed là John Chapman) => Loại đáp án A cross smiley5 Sau đó, ''when we were looking into the area of domesticated species of plants for our presentation, we realised that the introduction of the apple with the settlers in the US would be a good case study ''

=> Chủ đề họ đang nghiên cứu là giống cây được thuần chủng, và việc giới thiệu về táo và người định cư ở US (bao gồm John Chapman) phù hợp với chủ đề này. (không phải là họ muốn nói về nước Mỹ) => Loại đáp án B cross => Đáp án là Ccheck

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